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Mar 2012

Only Your Blood Is Enough, Part 2

Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. – Psalm 51:7

Click here for Part 1 in this series on Only Your Blood Is Enough.

If you were like me, the first time I found myself singing Only Your Blood Is Enough, I immediately thought, “What on earth am I singing about?” Bleeding birds? Bleeding beasts? Hyssop branch? What in the world is a hyssop branch? To begin to understand this song, we have to go back to Psalm 51:1-19.

David composed this psalm/prayer after the prophet Nathan confronted him about his adultery with Bathsheba, and his subsequent murder of her husband, Uriah. And even though the the situation that led to this particular psalm was intensely personal, the psalm as we have it today is meant to be sung as the gathering of worshipping Christians confess their sins.

Listen to Paul David Tripp explain Psalm 51:7, and unpack the significance of hyssop, in his book Whiter Than Snow: Meditations on Sin and Mercy:

It seems such a strange request from a man who’s in the throes of grief over sins that he can’t deny and can’t take back. I would propose to you that it was exactly the right thing for David and each of us to pray whenever we’re confronted with our sins. But when you first read the word in Psalm 51, it does make you wonder, “What in the world is hyssop?”

Researching the plant won’t give you much help. It produces a delicate white flower and is thought by some to have medicinal qualities. But this is one time that wikipedia.com won’t help you. What you really need to know, in order to understand the grieving in David’s request, is Old Testament history. David’s mind goes to that original Passover, when the firstborn of Egypt were stricken dead and the houses of Israel that had blood on the door frames, were passed over. What does this have to do with David’s request? Here it is. God directed the Israelites to take a branch of hyssop and dip it in blood and paint the door frames with it.

Here is David, grieved by his sin and bowed before God between the “already” and the “not yet.” Already the blood of the first Passover had protected Israel from death and made their exodus to freedom and the land of promise possible. Already the Mosaic system of constant animal-blood sacrifices covered the sins of God’s people. But the promised Lamb had not yet come. Not yet had his blood been spilt, once and for all, in the final moment of sacrifice that forever ended any need for further sacrifice.

So, reflecting on the past, David’s words actually reach into the future. They form the ultimate backdrop to the future prayer. For embedded in this cry for cleansing that remembers the spilt blood of deliverance (Passover) and the shed blood of forgiveness (Mosaic sacrifices), David cries for the one thing that anyone who acknowledges his sin will cry for; cleansing.

When your sin really does become ugly to you, when it produces pain in your heart and sickness in your stomach, you celebrate forgiveness, but you want something more. You want to be clean. You long to be once and for all purified from all sin whatsoever. You want your sin to be once and for all washed away. You want to be free of every dark residue of sinful thought, desire, word, or deed.

Yes, you’ll love the fact that you can stand before God dirty and unafraid because of his comprehensive and freely given grace. You’ll love the fact that his forgiveness of you has been full and complete. But you’ll grow tired of needing and seeking forgiveness. You’ll mourn the hold that sin has on you. You’ll be frustrated with the way that sin seems to infect everything you do. And you’ll begin to plead for what the blood of Jesus alone is able to do; wash away your sin! In this moment of need and helplessness, you’ll cry, “Purge me with hyssop Lord, dip the branch of your grace into the blood of your Son and cleanse me once and for all!”

You can listen to Only Your Blood Is Enough below by clicking the video, and you can purchase and download the song by clicking here.

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