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09

Aug 2012

Psalm 92:1-4 | For You, O Lord, Have Made Me Glad

It is good to give thanks to the LORD, to sing praises to your name, O Most High; to declare your steadfast love in the morning, and your faithfulness by night, to the music of the lute and the harp, to the melody of the lyre. For you, O LORD, have made me glad by your work; at the works of your hands I sing for joy. – Psalm 92:1-4

In my readings this week, Psalm 92 has had some unique intersections in my life, even culminating in a song that we will be singing this Sunday, Made Me Glad. Psalm 92 has been impressing upon me the purpose of God’s work, both in saving us and in keeping us safe and secure, which is to bring praise to Himself.

It is good to give thanks to the Lord,

Do I actually understand the fact that my worship and service on Sunday mornings should be out of the overflow of delight and pleasure that I find in God? The psalmist here wants me to understand that right worship is good because it is pure pleasure to those who truly love God. It is not simply my duty as a “good” Christian, but should be both a delight and a duty. Psalm 147:1 says it this way:

Praise the LORD! For it is good to sing praises to our God; for it is pleasant, and a song of praise is fitting.

The psalmist then shows some of the ways that I can rightly offer worship to God amongst his people:

It is good to give thanks to the LORD, to sing praises to your name, O Most High; to declare your steadfast love in the morning, and your faithfulness by night, to the music of the lute and the harp, to the melody of the lyre.

The first way is to simply give thanks for who He is, and for His actions and movement toward me as a believer. The second is to sing his praises with musical accompaniment. The third way the psalmist prescribes is to declare the goodness and greatness of the God whom I serve. Is any of this sounding familiar so far (Colossians 3:16)? In the context of this Psalm (which was meant to be sung on the Sabbath), worship, praising, singing, making music, and proclaiming are all a duty and a delight to the one who trusts in God. It is then in verse four that I find the right motivation behind all this:

For you, O LORD, have made me glad

The worship of the psalmist here is an overflow of the joy and gladness God has given him. Worship is not a drudgery for him, it is a delight. It is something that he looks forward to doing. Can I honestly say the same thing when I gather with other believers? Verse four then concludes with the subject and reason for all my worship and service towards Him:

For you, O LORD, have made me glad by your work; at the works of your hands I sing for joy.

He is worshipping God for who He is, what he has done, and sings for joy at what He continues to do by the work of his hands. Notice how the apostle Paul introduces the section dealing with our responsibilities as Christians. He turns our attention to the mercies of God. He talks of our service as an act of worship motivated by a gladness of heart:

I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect. – Romans 12:1-2

How much of my worship and service to the body of Christ is motivated purely by what I perceive is my duty? God here speaks of my service in terms of a duty which is delightful. His will is not only perfect, but also good and acceptable. So is my witness to God and His work an overflow of gladness in response to God’s work in my life? Or is it a duty that I begrudgingly perform?

Worship is at the heart of everything I do. But who am I worshipping? Am I obediently responding to God in a way that is both pleasing to him, and a delight to me? How thankful am I for the work of God’s hand? Ultimately, all of God’s works are for one purpose, to bring praise to His name through our worship: “He predestined us for adoption as sons…to the praise of his glorious grace…so that we who were the first to hope in Christ might be to the praise of his glory (Ephesians 1:5-12).” I pray that I would seek to be a better worshipper of God, not just because it is my duty, but I delight in doing so.

imagrs

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