Dealing With Doubts

The Reason for God: For years, Tim Keller has compiled a list of the most frequently voiced “doubts” skeptics bring to his Manhattan church. Why is there suffering in the world? How could a loving God send people to Hell? Why isn’t Christianity more inclusive? Shouldn’t the Christian God be a god of love? How can one religion be “right” and the rest “wrong”? Why have so many wars been fought in the name of God? These are just a few of the questions even ardent believers wrestle with today. In this book, Tim Keller uses literature, philosophy, real-life conversations and reasoning, and even pop culture to explain how faith in a Christian God is a soundly rational belief, held by thoughtful people of intellectual integrity with a deep compassion for those who truly want to know the truth.

Every Thought Captive: For a smaller and more user-friendly introduction to apologetics, you can’t get better than this one by Richard Pratt.

Atheism Remix: Wanting to both inform and equip serious-minded Christians regarding this cultural shift, R. Albert Mohler Jr. explores the environment that has bred the “new atheism” while also introducing readers to the movement’s four leading thinkers and the contours of their arguments. Mohler—deemed “the reigning intellectual of the evangelical movement in the US” by Time magazine—then uses this foundation to pinpoint eight major distinctives that make the new atheism new, and to discuss the future of Christianity in relationship to it.

Hope Has It’s Reasons: Incorporating the insights of modern literature and psychology with her understanding of searching modern hearts and minds, Pippert describes a road to knowledge that leads beyond the pursuit of self to the discovery of God.

Things That Cannot Be Shaken: It’s a quickly changing world out there. A world enamored with anything new. But all that “progress” comes with a price: we now live in a relativistic culture that appears to be missing an anchor. All authority is questioned. Truth has been thrown out with traditional views. And nothing seems sure. Especially not matters of faith.The current cultural climate does not encourage or equip Christians to remain tethered to the truth, but this book will. The authors focus on those “things that cannot be shaken” (Heb. 12:27)—specifically providing biblical responses to the concerns that Christians frequently encounter in the dorm room, the classroom, and the workplace.

How Long, O Lord?: This clear and accessible treatment of key biblical themes related to human suffering and evil is written by one of the most respected evangelical biblical scholars alive today. Carson brings together a close, careful exposition of key biblical passages with helpful pastoral applications.

Apologetics to the Glory of God: Professor John Frame has written a fantastic primer on the nature and practice of apologetics, or rather on the practice of “giving a defense for the hope that is within you.” Dr. Frame sheds needed light on the message and method of genuinely Christian apologetics. Giving special attention to application of the truth, he insightfully examines apologetics as proof, defense, and offense.

When God Weeps: It’s easy to trust God when things are going our way and the world makes sense. But when suffering strikes–especially seemingly senseless suffering–we are filled with doubt and stunned by events spiraling beyond our control. In the midst of suffering, we often question the very foundation of our faith–our belief in the God who says he loves us. Joni Eareckson Tada, a woman who has lived in a wheelchair for more than thirty years, and Steve Estes, a pastor and one of Joni’s closest friends, explore our questions and the answers. When God Weeps is not so much a book about suffering as it is about God. It tackles tough questions about heaven and hell, horrors and hardships, and why God allows suffering in this life.